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classmate, we came here, we couldn't even find our way to the credit union. we were so terrified. but together we came and lynn has brought an exceptional voice to families and to women. so often women heading up those families. and she spoke through the prism of her own experience, which is the most powerful story that anyone can ever tell. no one could ever say to lynn woolsey, you don't know what you're talking about. because they knew that she lived it, that she had experienced it and she came here to change so many women's lives, the lives of families, in terms of education for women and girls, for stronger family benefits. i could go on and on. and she brought great voice and vision to the unfortunate policy , the march to folly, when we invaded iraq. she came to this floor over 100 times to speak against that invasion and we are all -- we are all in her debt for her conscience, for her integrity, for her wonderful voice, for her friendship and for the -- her love of the environment of the coast of california. which if there is ever the magical touch of almighty god, you se
these states are smaller states, more rural states. states in which public employee unions have less leverage in the politics which makes a big difference. and i think where the infrastructure needs are nowhere near as great as they are in the states that have central cities which require massive public transportation. mechanisms. the fact that those analogies aren't there doesn't diminish in any way the quite prudent and proper steps that these states have taken to keep their own fiscal house in order. certainly having rainy day funds which many of the big northern states haven't had is absolutely critical to take care of the enormous variations that occur in budgets, in the economy. i think you can't lose sight of the fact that one of the reasons you have smaller medicaid expenditure is because of the federal formula. which favors some states because it isn't based on the actual need. it's based on a median income calculation. and as a result of that, a state like new york or california has a lot more poor people. and it also has a lot of rich people. it doesn't get the same break. i think
and humanitarian needs. we support the efforts of the interim government of mali and the african union, united nations, to prepare a military response in accordance with international law to address the threats of terrorist and extremists in northern mali. the threat of military force has contributed we think to a change in some of the northern groups as witnessed by the recent willingness of mnla and other members to renounce their efforts to establish an independent state in northern mali. the military concept propose and endorsed by the african union provides a foundation for planning a proposed military intervention in northern mali. however, several key questions must be answered to ensure that this response is well planned, well resourced, and appropriate. these issues include among other things the required force levels, the cost and funding needs, the logistical requirements, the operational timeliness, the protection of civilians, and ensuring that the proposed military action is adequately linked to a political strategy and an end state for military operations in the north. we have s
? all of those people saying that the teachers overcharged us and that the unions break the bank of the state? they should think about what a teacher has to go through. the kid's mother, the news lately was saying that she was some kind of survivalist, thinking the economist -- that the economy would crash. and that is why she had all these guns in the house. she has a mentally disturbed son with guns in the house? what is her choice? you know,what she thinking about? she obviously has a problem along with her son. someone should have come to earth, saying that we know where you are thinking about. look at the results. host: you live in new york city. what you think about mayor bloomberg and his opinion on the gun issue? caller code generally what mort zuckerman was talking about -- caller code generally put more zuckerman was talking about, how many times has he been caught at -- stopped and frisked on the street on his way to an important meeting? now they want to go through his pockets? he thinks that stop and frisk is ok? i will take my chances with the people in my community
, so he is american postal buddy. when the soviet union falls -- america's buddy. when the soviet union falls, he sees us to be useful. meanwhile, kabila seizes power. is a childul, soldier, commander of a group of child soldiers participating in that movement to get rid of him. he is assassinated within hours of the close of the clinton administration back in 2001. his son, 30 years old, former child commander of a child army, emerges as the president and he remains in power up to this time. his daddy was supported by the rwandan, angolans, zimbabweania. when he got to power, he told them all, i will be the one who controls the natural resources of this country. after he is assassinated -- what attributes do you attribute to the sun as far as his leadership abilities? joseph kabila, who was recently elected in 2011, which many characterized as a rigged election -- what do we know about the current president, and why do we support leaders in africa to exploit their citizens and the poverty that in sue's makes them more susceptible -- ensues makes them more susceptible to extremist eleme
. the french and the british have coalitions. the european union also did the same. we're way behind. second recommendation is, this has been going on for too long. although sometimes the arguments of we do not know the bad guys and good guys, i do not buy that. i do not buy that. there is a process. the prominent state sometimes are in contact with the military council and it designated a group today as a terrorist organization. so they know who was good and bad. the need to engage the situation where proactively, otherwise this terrorist organization will continue, and then i do not know what syria will look like a few months from now. unless you engage, even if you do not know the good guys from bad guys, you need to start somewhere. you need to engage the situation. unless you do this, you will have less influence going forward. in gauge the situation, the proactive about what is happening, and during that before it is too late. whether or not the u.s. helps with that will determine what sort of relationship that syria will have in the future. take a one quick point, washington thinks i
union and two articles from the ap and the new york times. if i could enter those things into the record, i would appreciate it. i wanted to get your perspectives on this. in your recent report you cite research showing 40% of credit disputes are related to collections, events. before we jump into that piece of it, over all, this issue of the complexity of medical that and resolving it, whether it is a good predictor or whether it should be part of the credit reporting system. >> i appreciate your bringing this issue up. it is definitely a source of concern. the fact that collections items are disputed at high rates is not a surprise. -information's its disputed more often than positive information. we should expect higher rates on collective items. i think you have pointed out in some of your own correspondence over half of collections items about 10 years ago a denture a fed study come from -- in a fed study comes from medical collections items, which is way out of proportion to the role the health-care system plays a in the economy compared to debt. >> is that the federal reserve stud
in the affirmative -- >> mr. speaker, i ask the unions. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york. the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 392 the nays are three. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the -- for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan rise? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to speak out of order for the purpose of making an announcement. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. the
contract workers are union workers. i do not hear the republicans hollering about that. i am is retired veteran. i think it is time we cut back on defense programs. we could close all of the military posts we have overseas since world war -- since world war ii, korea and vietnam. i like your opinion of what the republican said about these defense plants in their states with union workers. thank you. guest: thank you for your call and thank you for your service. we are drawing down with wars in iraq and afghanistan. to your point on defense contractors, we are sitting across the water from virginia. it is one of the larger states in terms of those numbers if you looked at it statistically. that is certainly an option. you are not hearing republican lawmakers, a lot about the relationship between contractors and union jobs. hopefully, it is something we will be looking to in the future. host: is there any discussion about how sequestration will affect the base closures? are there any basis on the chopping block if sequestration goes through? guest: opposed to looking at specific base clos
they appear to miss the point entirely. i remember at the student union, i was president once, we had a motion which instructed the united states to remove its troops instructed the united states that is a bit of big ask. here in this place, debates are different. debates have consequences. the most significant speeches are not necessarily the most stylish or the most fluid. they are the ones born of knowledge, of passion, of commit, and of concern. most of all, they are made by those who are here not only to speak for themselves, but to represent the people. todayed that is your opportunity, to speak out, based on your convictions and concerns to speak for young people whom you represent. and to speak out on issues which are relevant and where you can exert an influence inspect doing so, it will be in the best tradition of parliament democracy. before i finish, can i pay tribute to the administrate colleague. the administrate of children and families who is responsible for improving opportunity for young people and specifically for the support which the government provides to the youth parlia
, is really mikhail gorbachev. the soviet union fell apart during this period. the discretionary spending control was really all on the defense side. we went from 5.2% of gdp in 1994 the fence down to 4% by 1995. by 2000 we were at 3% of gdp. of course, this was justified by the fact that the evil empire was not there to justify our large defense establishments. but had that not happened, this might be judged by history in a very different way from how it is now judged. third, alan greenspan was a big player in this in the sense that as the budget brought under control he assured us of an accommodative monetary policy and interest rates drifted down. because of lots of different things, we entered into a period in which we had the longest, most robust expansion of our economy in american history. which cause, of course, revenues to rise very briskly. in part because of dotcom, in part because we had raised income taxes on the wealthiest americans at a time that we had just raise the marginal rates for those individuals. a confluence of all those factors got us from the largest deficits no
the biggest state in the union, a state where rim in sync. it takes a lot of courage for a senator from about the state at a small state -- california is bigger than the 21 states and the district of columbia combined. it takes a tremendous courage and backbone for people to stand up. leaders lead. we don't follow. we have had so much since the massive shooting at the texas bell power -- bell tower, along with the increased technological killing power of weapons in the united states. it's a big problem. >> this debate is only beginning. it has only been a week since this massacre. the nra will be irrelevant because it cannot be a credible and constructive participant and the debate. the -- better school security may be part of a solution, but it has to include a ban on assault weapons which have that kind of pop -- that kind of firepower that endangers everyone and i think republican or democrat, the key question is going to be making america a safer. the park of this debate will swing toward strong, serious proposals because the american people will not stand by idly for another neqtown. >>
ies inrises and companiy the soviet union. how do we make sure we are not taken in these public-private partnerships and are not giving a monopoly power for something that perhaps should be provided as a government service? >> one of the problems we have with the weather service right now is the fact that they have not been able to fly their new modern satellites. we risk a lot of the label information going forward because the government has not been capable of moving forward. -- delay of information going forward because the government has not been capable of moving forward. there are a number of ways that you can write bills to ensure that kind of activity, as i mentioned before, you can do it through a mechanism where the federal government remains actively involved in how these companies are doing their job, and provides an annual stream of funding. there are ways of structuring this that would assure the public interest is still maintained. >> the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. rabat. >> let me echo the gratitude that i have for having served with you.
this morning on "state of the union." [video clip] >> you have to focus on what will save this country and the president is doing nothing about the addiction that his administration has. >> i cannot not correct the record. those $700 billion, and all went to obama care. it was saved as part of a big spending program. here in washington people say cut while things grow. it is like having a freeze that is water and when it freezes, it expands. we have grown 100% in 12 years. the government is bigger and unless we do something now the government will continue to get bigger and the deficit will get bigger, even if we raise taxes on everyone there is still a huge deficit. if we do not take on spending, the fiscal cliff will be a downward slide to make us like greece, no longer a viable economic power. >> that was from the program " state of the union, close with this morning. a number of members of the house are point to try to make their way back for votes this evening at 6:30. the house taking up some 13 bills. here is how david hocking's of "congressional quarterly" termed this house ses
. it found that the u.s. has a bigger adjustment than any of the european unions. it gives an urgency for us to act. it is also possible to theorize about how a continuation of these policies could hurt growth farther into the future. a recent paper shows that if we do not act on this, and we are basically producing a fundamentally different america. it suggests that we are going to move into a world by 2040 were economic growth in the u.s. is not what we normally expect to see each year. there is crowding out of unity by the government. that is how urgent it is. what should we do? there is another large literature that looks at fiscal consolidations. using my own study as an example and along with my two colleagues, our metric of success is that they achieve deficit reduction. we found fiscal consolidations that were very heavily weighted for spending were much more likely to be except the both then consolidations that were heavily weighted toward tax increases. we speculate that this is because we find this result because the tax heavy fiscal consolidations do not make tough choices on ent
and african union is to bring all stakeholders together to craft will of lamentable solutions. we are delighted he is here for the testimony. the nine estates has run a peacekeeping mission. the time has come to fundamentally reconsider the mandate. the 17,000 troops deployed across that make of the united nations stabilization mission did not protect civilians in harm's way. this raises serious concerns. the largest failure remains with the drc's on forces and the inability to protect their citizens. the mandate should reflect the need for the country and the security sector must be reformed. last week we were delighted that the u.s. secretary general lost part of this mission. we hope the united states will take a leave, reporting significant changes. at a minimum the mandate must be strengthened to enable whatever forces remain to keep the peace and protect the people. we believe it should not be indefinite. an open-ended mandate undermines the urgency for them to take responsibility for their own. they should bring leaders together for serious negotiations. they should play a
disagreement with you with regard to unions. unions are very important it was unions that allowed my parents to raise seven children and as former sharecroppers with only a second grade education, and to extend to college and allow me to be a member of the congress, it was unions. i will fight until i die the for the strength of unions because they play a significanrole. as a representative from maryland, i know how critical the northeast quarter is to ensuring mobility. the corridor is critical and hosts many rail lines, and every year, 11 million passengers, our constituents, ride amtrak in the northeast corridor. the company last week was told it is only expected to increase the population growth. is that not wonderful? it is not as fast as we need. we need modern, high-speed rail service. we need it in the northeast corridor. i remind us this is america, the greatest country in the world. we should have the best service in the world. for that reason, i strongly support the vision for a high- speed rail, set forth by president obama. to designate the northeast corridor as a high-speed qua
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17